End-Caps

End-Caps

When I was just a little freshman, my first PIU Friday-night activity looked something like this:

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Tonight was my last Friday night as a PIU student; next Friday I become an alumnus.  Here is a glimpse at my final “Friday Night Frenzy.”

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I guess that inflatable bungee races are the end-caps to my college career.

Retrospect

Retrospect

I am 10 days away from graduation, and I have spent the entire day doing three things:

  • Packing my dorm room
  • Completing numerous “exit interviews”
  • Playing Scrabble

Currently, boxes and bags are strewn around me, one of the exit surveys is open in another tab on my computer, and I am trying to make a word out of LESONRV.

I have mastered multitasking.  But I can’t finish the exit survey.  I am stuck at the question that says:

Retrospect

If you could begin college again, would you choose to attend PIU?

I wish that “I don’t know” was an option.  On one hand, I have loved my time here.  I have made great friends, learned how to be a teacher, and grown closer to my Savior.  I don’t regret choosing PIU.

On the other hand, my interests have changed.  If I could start over, I would major in graphic design or photojournalism or video production.  As a result, I wouldn’t attend PIU.

I am weighing my answer because the survey assures me that all of my responses are “valuable input.”  I think about all of the memories that I would have missed if I hadn’t attended PIU–dreaming aloud with my roommate late at night, walking downtown to get smoothies, slowly tubing on the New River, bravely fighting cockroaches with my cousin, sledding the hill at Sparks Field, playing kickball in the pouring rain, throwing spaghetti noodles on the green, teaching 30 fifth-graders for 16 weeks.  These were the best of times, and I would have missed all of it if I had attended a different college.

So I think my answer is “yes.”  Yes, if I could begin college again, I would attend PIU.

Oh…and I just made the word ROSE for 29 points.

30 Before 30: Messy Twister

30 Before 30: Messy Twister

When the deans asked for suggestions for the semester’s first Friday Night Frenzy, I had an immediate answer: messy Twister.

twister5

I like it when people agree with me! 🙂

Top Ten Tuesday: Educational Games for Middle Schoolers

Top Ten Tuesday: Educational Games for Middle Schoolers

As an education major, some of our required assignments are nothing more than gathering materials to use in our classrooms.  In the present age, a list of web-based games is considered a necessary material.  Here are ten of my favorite games that I have found this year.

English:

  • Analogies – Students must determine which word correctly completes the analogies.  Words will only appear twice, so they need to think quickly!

analogiesgame.jpg

  • Guess the HomonymSum Some students have a hard thyme time trying too two to determine the write right  homophone or distinguish between homonyms.  This game can help.

homonymgame

Science:

  • Food Chain Game – As students learn about all the components of a biome’s food web, this game can help them review and practice putting producers, consumers, and decomposers in order.

foodchaingame

  • Photosynthesis Respiration Game – This game leads students step-by-step through the process of human cell respiration and plant cell photosynthesis.  Students must truly understand both concepts to successfully play the game.

respirationphotosynthesisgame.jpg

Social Studies:

geographygame.jpg

  • America on the Move – Perhaps the greatest evidence of our world’s advances is in the realm of transportation.  America on the Move provides three different games that help children learn about the history of transportation.

transportationgame

Math:

  • Fruit Shoot Fractions – This game, reminiscent of Fruit Ninja, requires students to “shoot” the answer to a fraction addition problem.  Because there are many levels, students of many different grades can play the game.

fruit shoot fraction game

  • Pre-Algebra Addition Shootout – Children who love soccer will enjoy choosing their goalkeeper, jersey color, an skill level before solving a variety of simple algebraic equations.

shootout equation game

Health:

  • Arthur’s Lunch-o-Matic – This tray needs some Vitamin A!  Students must choose the food that fits the cafeteria worker’s description.  The game will help children learn the benefits of eating a variety of foods.

aurthurgame

  • Blast Off! – Children’s bodies are just like rocket ships–they need fuel!  In this game, students fill their plate with a wide variety of foods to get enough fuel for an active day.

blast off game

 

Thanksgiving Bingo

Thanksgiving Bingo

I am not very good at playing Bingo.  You see, I never actually win.  I may get 24th-runner-up, but I never feel the pleasure of being the first to yell, “BINGO!”  Nonetheless, a game of Bingo is a great way to entertain students during a class party or family gathering.

If you need a time-filling activity for young children at an event, use the Thanksgiving themed Bingo game which I created to keep them busy!
thanksgiving bingo 1 thanksgiving bingo

Top Ten Tuesday: Game Night

Top Ten Tuesday: Game Night

game

If you have ever played a game with me, you don’t need to read the next few sentences; you know how competitive I am. You know that I get testy and impatient. You know that my usually soft voice slowly rises. You know that I always play to dominate, not just win, the game.

During my month-long Christmas break, I have played many board games and card games with family, friends, and daycare students. Below are my favorite games from the past few weeks.

Ten Most Enjoyable Games I Have Played This Month

1. The Logo Game
2. Othello
3. Balderdash
4. Backgammon
5. Such and Such
6. Baloney
7. Apples to Apples
8. Mastermind
9. Bananagrams
10. Telestrations

Other games I played during Christmas break:

  • Checkers
  • Uno
  • Cribbage
  • Monopoly
  • Boggle
  • Yahtzee